Swedish nears $1 billion in five years of community benefit

Swedish recently published its 2017 Community Benefit Report.

  • Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

Swedish today published its 2017 Community Benefit Report, detailing the organization’s almost $200 million investment in community benefit programs for the year.

This included almost $24 million in free and discounted care, a 12 percent increase from the prior year. Over the last five years, Swedish has invested more than $900 million in community benefit and is on track to increase this to more than $1 billion by the end of 2018.

“As CEO, I am incredibly proud of Swedish’s unwavering commitment to provide care to everyone who walks through our doors,” said Dr. Guy Hudson, Swedish CEO in a press release. “We believe in serving our communities with the highest quality care delivery by the best physicians, nurses and other caregivers.”

Read more of Dr. Hudson’s public message on the 2017 Community Benefit Report here.

As detailed in the report, Swedish is also proud to care for Medicaid patients, serving more than 107,000 Medicaid distinct patients in 2017. In fact, the organization committed to nearly $123 million in unfunded government-sponsored medical care (this does not include Medicare).

In addition, Swedish subsidized almost $17 million in clinical and social services, invested in more than $30 million in education and research programs, and spent over $4 million in community health, grants and donations.

Through Swedish’s Community Health Needs Assessment, the not-for-profit organization is focused on helping to address needs that are directly shaped by geography, demographics, environmental exposure, health-related issues and socioeconomic factors. A key component of finding innovative and measurable ways to reduce health care costs and improve the health of all people in the community includes partnering closely with more than 120 large and small local non-profit organizations like Lifelong, March of Dimes, American Diabetes Association, Community Lunch on Capitol Hill and the Somalia Health Board.

“We are committed to addressing growing community health concerns in a variety of areas including the mounting opioid epidemic, the increasing need for mental health services, the critical issue of reducing disparities in birth outcomes through improved maternal and child health initiatives, and the vital request of our LGBTQ community for a welcoming and inclusive environment for medical care,” continued Dr. Hudson in a press release.

As in years past, Swedish employees continued demonstrating their own personal commitment to the community by serving more than 6,500 volunteer hours collectively over the course of the year.

Locals can click here to read the full Swedish 2017 Community Benefit Report.

More in Life

Salmon, Science, Suds on Jan. 16

Presentations will focus on improving the health of the Sammamish watershed.

New Year resolution: Love yourself

Love yourself in 2019 and watch the positive changes.

Jiff Searing paints the door frame of the tiny house during the volunteer event on Saturday. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo
Issaquah citizens build a tiny house for the Low Income Housing Institute

An work party was held in Issaquah to build and donate a house to a low income tiny house village.

Diane Gillespie. Photo courtesy of Diane Gillespie
OPINION: Sleeping in troubled times

While adequate sleep is critical to good health and longevity, sleep deprivation is currently on the rise.

31st annual Reindeer Festival returns to Cougar Mountain Zoo

Cougar Mountain Zoo will run the 2018 Reindeer Festival every day until Dec. 23.

KCLS launched its first podcast called “The Desk Set.” The podcast is hosted by librarians Britta Barrett and Emily Calkins. Photo courtesy of “The Desk Set.”
KCLS launches first podcast, The Desk Set

Librarians Britta Barrett and Emily Calking co-host new podcast.

Nancy Stewart will preform her concert series in various libraries throughout King County. Families can visit the KCLS website to find upcoming concerts. Courtesy of Nancy Stewart.
Nancy Stewart’s ‘A Season for Singing’ concert coming to a library near you

King County Library System prepares for its annual Season of Stories and Songs.

Community gathers for annual Day of the Dead celebration

On Nov. 3, communtiy memebrs came out to the Issaquah Latino Club’s annual Day of the Dead event.

Detox for your body and mind

Dr. Allison Apfelbaum is a naturopathic primary care doctor in Woodinville.

Maywood Middle School hosts first district-wide Rubik’s Cube competition

Maywood Middle School hosted more than 60 students from around the Issaquah… Continue reading

Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank plans for facility expansion

To meet the need of the community, the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank is looking to expand.