Bellevue School Board President to run for State House seat

My-Linh Thai of Bellevue announced her intent to run for the 41st district representative.

  • Monday, April 2, 2018 3:02pm
  • News
Photo courtesy of My-Linh Thai

Photo courtesy of My-Linh Thai

Bellevue School Board President, health care professional, and PTA parent, My-Linh Thai, today announced her campaign for State Representative in the 41st legislative district.

She is the first candidate to file for this seat following the retirement announcement of Rep. Judy Clibborn.

“As a parent, Eastside neighbor, and education advocate, I am motivated every day by a commitment to improve outcomes and opportunity for the next generation,” said Thai, who moved to Washington State at the age 15 as a refugee from Vietnam. “That commitment to improving life and opportunity for others was instilled in me by the teachers, counselors, and community members who invested in me and helped me thrive here. But our region’s growth and affordability issues are making that reality impossible for too many. As a State Representative, I want to make sure we remain a welcoming community that celebrates our diversity and protects the rights of all people to achieve their dreams.”

Thai, who first got involved in her local PTA, won an “Outstanding Advocate” award for her efforts, and propelled her to serve as a Bellevue School Board Director and now Board President. She also serves as Vice President of the Washington State School Board Directors Association where she works to ensure all children across our state reach their full potential.

On the Association’s Legislative and Equity Committees, Thai advocates for investments in education statewide and important reforms so that each and every student has equitable access to educational opportunity.

“In Olympia, I will continue to advocate for investments in our local schools that enhance parent and community engagement, establish high student expectations with diverse and challenging curricula, close the Opportunity-Gap for at-risk students, and improve district services to accommodate students with special needs,” Thai said.

“My-Linh Thai is a passionate, outspoken fighter for education and our kids.” King County councilmember Claudia Balducci said. “She is the kind of leader who puts her community first and who knows how to get things done. My-Linh will be an outstanding and effective leader for us in Olympia.”

A graduate from the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, My-Linh and her husband Don built a successful pediatric neurology practice from the ground up in Casper, Wyoming and she later worked as a practicing pharmacist in Billings, Montana.

“Representing 41st District families in the Legislature, one of my priorities will be public health and safety,” Thai said. “I will work to improve access to affordable healthcare including mental health, as well as safe schools, streets, and neighborhood.”

My-Linh and her husband, now a neurologist at Valley Medical Center, have lived in Bellevue for the past ten years. Their two children attend High Schools in the Bellevue School District.

“I am going to approach this campaign with the tenacity I bring to everything I do,” Thai said. “I look forward to listening to neighbors across this district about their priorities for our district and working tirelessly to ensure their voices are heard in Olympia.”

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