The official ribbon cutting on the new extension project was held on Monday, Jan. 28. City staff, contract workers, financial partners, and citizens all gathered for behind the ribbon for the official ceremony. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The official ribbon cutting on the new extension project was held on Monday, Jan. 28. City staff, contract workers, financial partners, and citizens all gathered for behind the ribbon for the official ceremony. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

City completes largest capital project in its history

After two years of closure, the SE 62nd Street extension project is opened for public use.

After two years of closure and nearly a decade of planning, the Southeast 62nd Street Extension project in Issaquah was completed and opened for public use on Tuesday, Jan. 29.

The road project now connects Eastlake Sammamish Parkway and Lake Drive through the newly extended Southeast 62nd street. The project features an 800-foot bridge as part of the connection and a roundabout that will mange traffic flow crossing east and west, but also north and south to 221st Place Southeast and Fourth Avenue Northwest.

Public works director Sheldon Lynne said the project did more than just connect roads. The city was able to take six acres of land between the north fork and the main stem of Issaquah Creek and preserve it as open space (it had been zoned for multi-family residential development). The project also created two acres of wetland.

The crossing now includes a grade separated path for East Lake Sammamish Trail that runs underneath the elevated roundabout, meaning pedestrians and cyclists no longer interact with vehicle traffic passing through.

Mayor Mary Lou Pauly said the project is the largest capital project in the history of the city at a total of about $44 million. Funding the project wouldn’t have been possible with out the city’s partners on the project, she said. The city of Issaquah only put $4 million into the project while partners like Costco contributed $23 million, and the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board and Department of Commerce put in a combined sum of more than $15 million.

It has taken nearly 10 years from the inception of the project to get to this point. The city began work on a funding package in 2010, which was completed in 2015.

The road extension came about to alleviate current and future traffic planned as the city grows, especially as Costco corporate headquarters plans for its expansion project. Costco has contributed $25 million to a suite of three transportation projects related to the business’s expansion in the city, with the extension project being the largest by far.

Pauly thanked residents and businesses who have been patient with the project and as construction had to cut off one of the four highway crossings in the city.

“Thank you to the community — we closed one of the four under-crossings of Interstate 90 in town for two years and the community has been frustrated but enormously patient,” she said. “It’s so exciting that we can open it up for traffic.”

Mayor Mary Lou Pauly talks to the audience about the work put in to making the largest capital project in city history a reality. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Mayor Mary Lou Pauly talks to the audience about the work put in to making the largest capital project in city history a reality. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

A project map for the SE 62nd Street Expansion shows the connections made from Eastlake Sammamish Parkway to Lake Drive. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

A project map for the SE 62nd Street Expansion shows the connections made from Eastlake Sammamish Parkway to Lake Drive. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

More in News

Photo courtesy of King County Parks
                                Trailhead Direct returns April 20 with new routes.
Trailhead Direct returns with more routes

Transit-to-trails returns April 20.

Issaquah begins work to address findings by the State Auditor’s Office

Issaquah council approves contract with a third party to address financial operations issues.

EvergreenHealth seeks to secure funding through a voter-approved bond measure that would pay for critical upgrades at the Kirkland medical center. The Family Maternity Center was last renovated in 1996 and officials hope to modernize the space for new families. Kailan Manandic/staff photo
EvergreenHealth seeks support in upcoming ballot measure

The health system is asking for local voters to approve a bond measure of $345 million over 20 years.

Jim Pitts stands on walkway overlooking filtration chambers at the King County South Filtration Plant in Renton. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Human waste: Unlikely climate change hero?

King County treatment plant joins effort to counteract effects of carbon dioxide.

King County purchases 24.6-acre parcel to restore creek and salmon habitat

King County has progressed their land conservation effort with the purchase of a 24.6 acre property.

IHS students walkout to protest racist post on Wednesday with a sign that says “Change is More Than a ReTweet.” Madison Miller / staff photo
IHS students walkout to protest racist post

Over 200 IHS students walked out of class Wednesday, sharing messages of intolerance to racism, hope for a better future, and a call for change.

Advocates hold a rent control rally in Olympia on Feb. 27, the day before Oregon passed legislation capping rent increases and prohibiting no-cause evictions. Photo courtesy of Amy Tower/Tenants Union of Washington State
Would rent control work in Washington?

Oregon’s new law could lay the blueprint for other states

Most Read