Several of the volunteers and community members at the Day of the Dead celebration on Nov. 3. From left: Adriana Hernandez Chavez, Adriana Hernandez Hernandez, Nayeli Muñoz, Alicia Spinner, Mariana Garza Lopez, Marisol Visser, Hilda Leal, Selen Soto Gonzalez y Daniela Reveles. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Several of the volunteers and community members at the Day of the Dead celebration on Nov. 3. From left: Adriana Hernandez Chavez, Adriana Hernandez Hernandez, Nayeli Muñoz, Alicia Spinner, Mariana Garza Lopez, Marisol Visser, Hilda Leal, Selen Soto Gonzalez y Daniela Reveles. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Community gathers for annual Day of the Dead celebration

On Nov. 3, communtiy memebrs came out to the Issaquah Latino Club’s annual Day of the Dead event.

Community members came out to Blakley Hall on Saturday, Nov. 3, for the Issaquah Latino Club’s annual Day of the Dead event.

Featuring a handmade altar, various tables for kids crafts and activities, and a potluck dinner prepared by community members, the event was seemingly a huge hit. The Day of the Dead, or Dia De Los Muertos, is a traditional Mexican holiday where people celebrate and honor the lives of loved ones who have died.

Alicia Spinner, founder of the Latino club and editor of the Issaquah Schools Foundation magazine Cultural Connections, said the community event initially was held at her home with just a few decorations. Over time her neighbors and other community members started getting involved leading Spinner and another community member to trade off hosting the event at their homes every other year. Eventually the number of attendees were too great and the house was no longer a big enough venue.

After three years, Spinner contacted Christy Gerrard, executive director of the Issaquah Highlands council, to ask if they could use Blakely Hall as the location for a community Day of the Dead event. Blakely Hall has been the event’s location event since.

Selen Soto-Gonzalez, an Issaquah resident contributed to the event this year by designing the altar where photos of family members who have died were displayed. She explained the various different elements that go into the design and the cultural significance of the altar itself. Food, drinks and other items were placed around the altar as tribute to the dead.

Soto-Gonzalez said the event fosters cultural connections not just with the community but with the people who have died. Events like the Day of the Dead connect people with their cultural traditions and those traditions connect families by remembering and honoring the lives of the people who have died.

The altar was designed by Selen Soto-Gonzalez and is a tribute to the lives of family members who have died. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The altar was designed by Selen Soto-Gonzalez and is a tribute to the lives of family members who have died. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

‘La Catrina’ handmade by local artist Sarahi Ayala-Vela. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

‘La Catrina’ handmade by local artist Sarahi Ayala-Vela. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Franco Esquivel looks up after working on his arts and crafts along with many of the other kids at the event. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Franco Esquivel looks up after working on his arts and crafts along with many of the other kids at the event. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

More in News

BPA could remove thousands of trees along Eastside transmission lines

The maintenance would affect power lines running from Renton to Monroe.

Bellevue pastor Phil Antilla said his support of the LGBTQ community will continue, following a controversial global vote of the United Methodist Church. Ashley Hiruko/staff photo
United Methodist vote has churches’ future in question

Congregations debate separation following gay-clergy, same-sex marriage ban.

Dedicated dog park coming to Issaquah’s Tibbetts Valley Park

Tibbetts Valley Park has been chosen as the location of the city’s first official dog park.

Bonds, sales tax increase on table for transportation improvements

Unfunded transportation capital projects list is estimated at $113.6 million from 2019 to 2022.

Costco captive insurer pays $3.6 million to state

NW Re Limited settled after voluntarily reporting their actions.

The Cedar Hills Regional Landfill is the only active landfill in King County. It will operate until at least 2028. It has been in operation since the 1960s. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Waste study puts numbers behind King County trash alternatives

County has one remaining landfill located near Maple Valley, and it’s nearing capacity

U.S. is now grounding Renton-made 737 MAX 8 and 9; Boeing supports decision

Update: The decision does not affect Renton production lines.

Redmond Mayor John Marchione was among many community members to place their hand prints in the wet cement below the new sign at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in Redmond after the mosque’s old sign was vandalized in 2016. File photo
Examining hate crimes on the Eastside

The Anti-Defamation League has been tracking hate-fueled crimes and incidents to paint a picture of trends in communities.

Most Read