Issaquah Farmers Market rich in produce, tulips | Photos

Issaquah's Saturday market is in full bloom this year with plenty of green vegetables to start the season.

Yibing Cai

Issaquah’s Saturday market is in full bloom this year with plenty of green vegetables to start the season.

Piles of kale, lettuce and Swiss chard filled the tables at Lee’s Produce, a Redmond-based farm run by the Lee family. They had a consistent flow of customers, eager to get their hands on local goods.

“You can really tell what’s in season, because its what people have,” said Bryan Beatty, holding a shopping bag of booty from the stand.

The next thing to hit the markets will be mustard greens and sugar peas. Xiong Lee, however, doesn’t expect to see tomatoes at his stand until late June or early July.

The Western-Washington farm has different seasons than vendors that come from Walla Walla. Last week, asparagus and a few apples dominated offerings from the East. All of the produce is grown in the state.

While the fresh fruits and vegetables drew Yibing Cai to Issaquah’s market for the first time this year, she enjoys the community atmosphere and friendly faces, she said. “I love to enjoy the food and share the happiness.”

In addition to produce and flowers – tulips are in full bloom this month – the market also has a large number of food vendors. They sold everything from hot food, including savory crepes, tacos and Thai, to goods for later, such as baked bread and artisan cheeses.

Molly Moon’s ice cream from Seattle even made a showing with an ice cream truck.

The red Pickering Barn acts as a backdrop to the weekly affair. Arts and crafts vendors dominated the inside of the historic structure.

On a sunny day, the market can draw 4,500 people. Once its in full-swing, it has about 115 regular vendors, including 30 farmers.

When: 9 a.m.-2 p.m., saturdays, April 21 – Oct. 13

Where: Pickering Barn (across the street from Costco), 1730 10th Ave. NW, Issaquah

Information, including vendors: issaquahfarmersmarket.org

Xiong Lee from Lee’s Produce in Redmond trims Swiss Chard at the Issaquah Farmers Market April 28. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

Song Thor builds a bouquet for a customer at the Issaquah Farmers Market April 28. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

Tulips are in full bloom this month. They filled farmers’ tables at the Issaquah market Saturday. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

Xiong Lee, from Lee’s Produce, bundles Swiss chard at the Issaquah Farmers Market April 28. It’s the beginning of the season for the farmers, who are primarily offering hearty greens this time of season. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

Yi Cha builds a bouquet at the Issaquah Farmers Market. He grows his flowers in Monroe. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

A shopper totes locally grown leeks as she passes through the Issaquah Farmers Market. BY CELESTE GRACEY, ISSAQUAH & SAMMAMISH REPORTER

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