The stained glass windows in the Providence Heights chapel were designed by late, world-renowned French artist Gabriel Loire. Photo courtesy of Michael Sladek

The stained glass windows in the Providence Heights chapel were designed by late, world-renowned French artist Gabriel Loire. Photo courtesy of Michael Sladek

Preserve Providence Heights encourages calls to officials

Historically-landmarked campus set to be demolished

  • Thursday, December 14, 2017 4:15pm
  • News

Newly-formed nonprofit Preserve Providence Heights encourages Issaquah and Sammamish residents to take action to save the Providence Heights campus.

The Providence Heights campus, located at 4441 228th Ave., Issaquah, is a former college built for the Sisters of Providence. The campus includes a chapel with 30-foot stained glass windows designed by late, world-famous artist Gabriel Loire of France.

In July, the Issaquah Landmarks Commission named Providence Heights a city of Issaquah landmark.

However, in an October lawsuit settlement between the city and the campus’ owner, Churchome (formerly known as the City Church) of Kirkland, the city allowed Churchome to demolish the buildings.

Churchome is now preparing to tear down the entire campus. Demolition of the buildings could start as early as next week.

“Hundreds of people are up in arms about Providence Heights being demolished,” stated Susan Hass, director of Preserve Providence Heights, in a press release. “Issaquah School District has authorized itself to acquire Providence Heights but has not committed itself to acquire it. The district can build much-needed public schools on sites accessible by walking and biking, instead of this site.”

Preserve Providence Heights asks those who does not want the historic campus to be lost to call the following elected representatives today and ask them to join the effort to stop the demolition:

• King County Executive Dow Constantine: 206-263-9600

• King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert: 206-477-0932

• U.S. Sen. Patty Murray: 866-481-9186 (Washington, D.C.), 206-553-5545 (Seattle)

Additionally, anyone who may know of a potential buyer of the property is urged to contact Preserve Providence Heights at preserveprovidence heights@gmail.com or 425-999-0681.

Each of the stained glass windows is 30 feet high. Photo courtesy of Michael Sladek

Each of the stained glass windows is 30 feet high. Photo courtesy of Michael Sladek

Advocates of saving Providence Heights say that it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as housing for the homeless. Nicole Jennings/staff photo

Advocates of saving Providence Heights say that it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as housing for the homeless. Nicole Jennings/staff photo

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