Sammamish mayor joins co-chairs of Lake Washington Citizens Levy Committee

Committee aims to pass levies and bonds for Lake Washington School District in Feb. 13 special election.

  • Friday, January 19, 2018 4:00pm
  • News

The mayors of all three communities served by the Lake Washington School District have been named honorary co-chairs of the campaign to pass the Feb. 13 school levies and bond propositions, the Lake Washington Citizens Levy Committee announced.

Sammamish Mayor Christie Malchow, elected in January, joins former Sammamish Mayor Bob Keller, who finished his term in December, as well as Kirkland Mayor Amy Walen and Redmond Mayor John Marchione in supporting the propositions, which the committee believes are good for students, schools and the community.

The bond provides more classroom space to help relieve overcrowding. The levies provide the funding needed to maintain the district’s excellent educational programs. The bond and levies fund critical education needs that are not covered by state funding, including paying for existing staff, current programs and desperately-needed facilities. Combined, Propositions 1, 2 and 3 address overcrowding and provide needed resources while reducing the local tax rate.

“We are fortunate to have these outstanding community leaders uniting with us to support these important bond and levy measures,” said Eric Campbell, CEO of Main Street Property Group and a member of the citizens committee. “They recognize the value of a high-quality education system to a thriving community. And we can do it through a thoughtful, long-term approach to improve our children’s schools while reducing the tax rate.”

Lake Washington School District parent Martha DeAmicis added, “By agreeing to serve as honorary co-chairs, our mayors have demonstrated that the February 2018 bond and levy propositions are a sensible solution to address the needs of our rapidly-growing school district, ensuring our children are getting the best opportunities to learn.”

The citizens levy committee has a rapidly growing list of individuals and organizations from across the district endorsing the bond and levy propositions. For more information, visit the LWCLC’s website at www.vote4lwsdkids.org.

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