Sammamish Plateau Water sets public meeting on rate increases for Dec. 3

Sammamish Plateau Water will hold a meeting on Dec. 3 to take pubic comment on 2019 rate increases.

Sammamish Plateau Water has announced a public meeting on Monday, Dec. 3, to take feedback on proposed increases to the 2019 water and sewer rates. The meeting also will take feedback on the 2019 budget.

Sammamish Plateau Water (SPW) is a utilities district providing water and wastewater services to portions of Issaquah, Sammamish and unincorporated King County. The total service area covers 29 square miles and serves about 64,000 people.

The district has proposed raising both the water and sewer rates in 2019. The water rate proposal is an increase of 3.75 percent for both fixed water charge and the variable water consumption charge. In a press release, the district gave an example of a single family residential customer. If the residential customer used between 350 to 750 cubic feet per month, that customer would have an increase of $1.36 to $1.67 on their monthly water bill.

Sewer rates are proposed to be increased by 3.25 percent, resulting in a monthly increase for a single family home anywhere from $1.14 to $36.05 per month depending on usage.

SPW finance manager Angel Barton said the biggest driver of the increase in both water and sewer services are the capital replacement projects that allow the district to replace and maintain infrastructure to provide reliability for their customers. The district also will be adding personnel in 2019.

More information on the upcoming board meeting can be found at spwater.org.

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