U-cut and pre-cut Christmas trees around the Snoqualmie Valley

As the holiday season approaches, several Snoqualmie Valley businesses are gearing up their offerings of Christmas tree services.

The Snoqualmie Valley Venturing Crew 115, a nonprofit coed division of the Boy Scouts of America, are returning to the corner of Snoqualmie Parkway and State Route 202 for their annual Christmas Treelot. Open on Nov. 23, the lot offers pre-cut trees and is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday; and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

Members of the crew ages 14 to 21 run the operations and all the money goes toward funding crew events year round. On Sundays in December, the lot also hosts a free pancake breakfast and features appearances by Santa Claus on Dec. 2 and 9.

Sitting four miles outside of the city limits of North Bend and Snoqualmie near Mount Si, the Mountain Creek Tree Farm opened on Nov. 16 and will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 6821 440th Ave. SE, Snoqualmie. They offer Douglas, Noble, Turkish, Grand, and Fraser firs.

There are also several tree farms in the city of North Bend. Christmas Creek Tree Farm, located at 15515 468th Ave. SE, North Bend, opens on Nov. 23 and offers U-cut Noble, Nordmann, Douglas, and Grand firs in addition to pre-cut trees. They will be open on Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Dec. 2.

Cedar Falls Tree Farm offers u-cut trees services and have Norway Spruce as well as Noble, Turkish, Fraser, Grand, Douglas, Nordmann, and Alpine firs. Opened on Nov. 24, the Cedar Falls Christmas Tree Farm runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays, at 15200 Cedar Falls Road SE, North Bend.

Crown Christmas Tree Farm, 805 SE 12th St., North Bend, is open daily from Nov. 18 to Dec. 23 starting at 9 a.m and closing at dusk. They offer u-cut and pre-cut services with Noble, Grand, Turkish, Noble and Nordmann firs.

Keith and Scott Tree Farms have two locations in North Bend, with one by Thrasher Road at 42999 SE 120th St. and another at 43342 SE Mt. Si Road. These tree farms are open from 9 a.m. to dusk on Saturdays and Sundays. The Thrasher road location sells trees at a flat rate and the Mount Si location prices their taller trees by the foot.

The Snoqualmie Ranger Station at 902 SE North Bend Way is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekdays and on weekends from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 3, 9 and 10. The U.S. forest Service sells tree permits that allow people to find their own tree on Forest Service Land. Maps and additional information s to tree locations are provided with the permit. Permits are $10 and allow the holder to cut a tree up to 12 feet. Two permits allows the holder to cut a 20-foot tree.

Fall City Farms, 3309 Neal Road, Fall City, will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays starting on Dec. 1. They provide a u-cut service with Grand, Noble, and Nordmann firs, in addition to Douglas and Fraser firs.

Carnation Tree Farm, 3861 Tolt Ave., Carnation, opens on Nov. 23 and runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The offer u-cut services for Norway and Blue Spruce, and Douglas, Fraser, Grand, and Nordmann firs. They also bring in pre-cut Noble Firs.

Ronnei Christmas Tree Farm, 11210 Carnation-Duvall Road NE, Carnation, also opens on Nov. 23 and run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends. Douglas, Grand, and Noble firs are available for U-cut along with pre-cut Noble Firs.

Novelty Hill Tree Farm, 26617 NE 124th St., Duvall, opens on Nov. 23. Their holiday hours are from 4-7 p.m. on Tuesday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 8 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays. They offer pre-cut Noble, Grand, and Douglas firs.

Further north, Duvall’s Snow Valley Christmas Tree Farm at 17651 W. Snoqualmie River Road NE opened on No. 18. Their 100-acre farm features Norway Spruce and Noble, Grand, Fraser, Turkish, and Nordmann firs. They are open from 1-4 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends.

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