Where to pick up a pumpkin this October

The Eastside has a few options for seasonal squash hunters.

Fall is in full swing and for many folks that means it’s pumpkin hunting season. While the orange squash can be found outside supermarkets across the country, those looking for more of an experience can head east to some of the region’s pumpkin patches.

A handful of farms in the area offer patches where patrons can peruse and pick their produce in peace, and many also offer additional products like cider, veggies and honey.

Fall City Farms, located just outside its namesake city in east King County, is a 150-acre operation with goats, chickens, cows and a donkey. Manager Madeline Banashak said they opened for the season during the last weekend in September, a week earlier than usual. The pumpkin patch will be open until the weekend before Halloween. It’s her third year running the operation, and she’s worked at the farm for 13 years.

“I think the next two weekends are gonna be busy,” she said. “It’s a fun season — a really fun energy — we have people that come back year after year.”

The biggest pumpkin grown this year was 63 pounds, with the majority of pumpkins growing to about 30 pounds. In addition to pumpkins the farm sells homemade donuts on Saturday and Sunday and offers wagon rides and cider. The farm sells vegetables to local restaurants, but the surplus is sold at the farm’s store. It is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Serres Farm outside of Redmond is another option for pumpkin hunters. The farm is open Tuesday through Friday from 3 to 6 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends. The 24-acre farm is a family operation run by Bill and Nancy Serres who bought the first few acres in 1977.

The farm is focused on growing pumpkins and Christmas trees and has an old barn, corn maze and other games.

To the north in Carnation, Two Brothers Pumpkin Patch at the Game Haven Greenery is open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and offers a 6-acre pumpkin patch. All pumpkins are grown on site, said Kristina Schmoll.

“Every seed touches our hand, we weed everything by hand and it’s totally a family thing,” she said.

Remlinger Farms in Carnation also is open every weekend in October from 10 am. to 6 p.m. The farm charges an admission fee of $20.75 plus tax, but also offers live entertainment, tractor hay rides and discounted pumpkin prices. In addition, there are more than 25 rides and attractions like a roller coaster, hand-led pony trail rides and a hay maze.

On Oct. 20 and 21, Carnation Farms in Carnation will host free harvest festivals, offering pumpkins for purchase, refreshments, cider demonstrations, and crafts. The festivals are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fox Hollow Farm just south of Issaquah hosts a similar festival Wednesday through Sunday and charges $10 per person during weekdays and cars with up to seven people can get in for $50 on weekends. The farm offers a pumpkin patch, animal petting, a hay maze and tractor rides. It is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday.

Fall City Farms: 3636 Neal Rd SE, Fall City

Serres Farm: 20306 NE 50th St, Redmond

Two Brothers Pumpkin Patch: 7110 310th Ave NE, Carnation

Remlinger Farms: 32610 NE 32nd St, Carnation

Carnation Farms: 28901 NE Carnation Farm Road, Carnation

Fox Hollow Farm: 12123 Issaquah-Hobart Rd SE, Issaquah

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