Katie Remine servicing a motion-activated wildlife camera in one of many remote camera sites. Photo courtesy of Woodland Park Zoo

Katie Remine servicing a motion-activated wildlife camera in one of many remote camera sites. Photo courtesy of Woodland Park Zoo

Conservation programs hold presentation in Issaquah on coexisting with local wildlife

Conservation Northwest and Woodland Park Zoo discuss engaging the community in conservation efforts.

The constant development of urban areas and the recent boom in the population of Western Washington has pushed some wildlife out of their natural habitats, causing humans and animals to interact frequently.

“Carnivores, Communities, Science and Coexistence,” a presentation on volunteer-powered wildlife conservation programs from Conservation Northwest and Woodland Park Zoo, was held on Feb. 20 at the Flemming Arts Center in Issaquah.

The presentation included an overview of the two different programs that require community involvement on the Eastside, the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project from Conservation Northwest and Woodland Park Zoo’s Coexisting with Carnivores program.

Laurel Baum, Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project coordinator, described how the project informs conservation efforts by gathering data on wildlife movement and presence in remote areas of Washington.

“We’re really focused on eight species,” said Katie Remine, living Northwest conservation coordinator. “Seven of them actually belong to the taxonomic order Carnivora — black bear, bobcat, cougar, coyote, raccoon, river otter and red fox. Some of them do have a totally carnivorous diet, but some of them don’t, like Raccoons are very omnivorous, but they still belong in that taxonomic order. And then the one other species we focus on is the opossum, which is not in that order, but we’re just really interested in how they interact with the other species.”

Katie Remine and Kodi Jo Jaspers of Woodland Park Zoo discussed Coexisting with Carnivores, a community engagement program that focuses on preventing human-wildlife conflict in the region by using community-developed strategies.

According to Conservation Northwest, the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project is in its 14th year and is one of the largest citizen-science wildlife monitoring efforts in North America. Each year more than 100 volunteers help gather data, images and maintain remote camera sites in Southern British Columbia and Washington. The project also assists in the winter snow tracking of the Interstate 90 corridor.

“Our training for that is coming up in April,” Baum said. “Volunteers join a team with an experienced volunteer and go out into the field every four to six weeks to service their cameras, bring back images and the data of wildlife that they’ve documented and then submit that to the larger project.”

Anyone can apply to participate with no conservation or scientific background required, although due to vast interest in the program, new volunteer positions are limited. To become a volunteer, contact monitoring@conservationnw.org.

Coexisting with Carnivores is a program co-facilitated by Woodland Park Zoo, Issaquah School District, and the city of Issaquah in efforts to engage the community in carnivore research and coexistence with the local wildlife.

“It started back in 2012, as a partnership program between the middle schools and the zoo and engages sixth-graders in investigating carnivores in their community and through that developing science skills, as well as understanding that they share space with carnivores and how do we coexist with carnivores,” Remine said. “In 2017, we got a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and that allowed us to expand that program more broadly to the community and work with community members as well. That work includes empowering community members to foster actions in their neighborhoods to promote coexistence with carnivores.”

With more and more animals being displaced from their habitats, encounters between humans and carnivores are inevitable.

“My biggest goal is just to have people take that curiosity and really want to take that into a drive to learn more about our wildlife species in Washington State,” Baum said. “So learning about conservation issues, learning about endangered species, what are the threats to wildlife in our region, and maybe supporting that either with their voice or who they’re in touch within their community or even voting for good conservation policy on a state level.”

To learn more about wildlife monitoring programs or to participate in conservation efforts visit www.conservationnw.org or www.zoo.org/coexisting.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@issaquahreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.issaquahreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Life

Deception Pass State Park. Deception Pass is a strait separating Whidbey Island from Fidalgo Island. File photo
Free Park Days in 2021 start in January

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission will again offer 12 free… Continue reading

Courtesy photo/Cargill
Boehm’s receives national recognition for its chocolates

Boehm’s Candies & Chocolates was named in Top 12 confectioners nationally

Issaquah Zombie Walk courtesy photo.
Zombies coming home this weekend in Issaquah

The annual zombie walk event is coming to homes through an online event Saturday

File photo from September 2016, when hundreds participated in the Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s event at Redmond Town Center.
Eastside Walk to End Alzheimer’s Oct. 10

Similar to other walk events in the region, Alzheimer’s Association encourages registered users to walk in a location of their choice

Diya Garg, left, distributes Mighty Crayon recycles crayons and coloring books for Seattle students. Courtesy photo/Diya Garg.
Getting crayons to kids runs in the family

Eastside nonprofit Mighty Crayon is relaunched by younger sister of founder, repurposing used restaurant crayons

Enzo’s Bistro and Bar/Justin Oba
New Issaquah restaurant brings Italian cuisine in family-friendly setting

Enzo’s Bistro and Bar, located at the former Pogacha of Issaquah, brought back some of the staff from the old restaurant

Courtesy Friends of Lake Sammamish State Park.
Walk’n Wag at your pace with extended virtual event

A scenic course for dog walkers is on display at Lake Sammamish through Sept. 2o

Issaquah youth perform timely message during pandemic
Issaquah youth perform timely message during pandemic

Students with the Kaleidoscope School of Music are putting together a performance for Aug. 31 on YouTube

Photo: Issaquah Food and Clothing bank gets generous donation from seniors
Photo: Issaquah Food and Clothing bank gets generous donation from seniors

The donation from a local retirement community totaled $5,175

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid. Courtesy photo
2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid | Car review

There’s a reason Honda’s CR-V has been America’s top-selling crossover vehicle over… Continue reading

2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat. Courtesy photo
2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat | Car review

Ford’s venerable compact Ranger pickup went away for a while. But it… Continue reading