For the 15th year, Jacksons Food Stores are matching donations dollar-for-dollar in support of the annual Gift of Peace campaign to help end domestic violence. Photo courtesy of Fiona Gwozdz

For the 15th year, Jacksons Food Stores are matching donations dollar-for-dollar in support of the annual Gift of Peace campaign to help end domestic violence. Photo courtesy of Fiona Gwozdz

15th annual Gift of Peace campaign works to help end domestic violence

All dove sales go to support Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV).

Many people seek opportunities to help others during the holiday season.

Some donate to their favorite charity, some volunteer their time or service to an organization, and some shop at their local Jacksons food store.

For the 15th year, Jacksons Food Stores are matching donations dollar-for-dollar in support of the annual Gift of Peace campaign to help end domestic violence.

Customers who donate $1, $5, or $10 will receive a paper peace dove to hang in support of survivors and help bring visibility to the campaign in Jacksons Food Stores and Jacksons-owned ExtraMile stores across six western states, including Washington.

All dove sales go to support Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV), a statewide nonprofit member organization focused on prevention, intervention and other supports for domestic violence survivors and their families.

According to Judy Chen, executive director of WSCADV, member organizations provide services ranging from emergency shelter, housing, public policy and advocacy, to counseling and other supports for survivors and their families.

“Jacksons Food Stores’ Gift of Peace campaign does more than raise funds — it shows survivors that their community supports them and sees the problem of domestic violence as one we all must work on together to solve,” Chen said in a press release. “We’re grateful to Jacksons for taking a stance on this issue and supporting us through this campaign. It shows the community that our collective impact can and does change lives.”

Fiona Gwozdz, a public relations director with Jacksons Food Stores, said the origin of the dove image stems from the original peace dove idea.

“The goal is to help bring more peace to these communities where the campaign can have an impact, flocking for peace it would seem,” she said.

The annual Gift of Peace campaign has raised more than $1.35 million in donations since it began in 2004. Last year, between Thanksgiving and Christmas, Jacksons Food Stores and its customers raised a total of $187,314 for state domestic violence coalitions in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Arizona and Utah.

In Washington, customers contributed $12,243 to the cause in 2018. Jacksons matched that amount to further amplify the community’s impact and support the WSCADV with a total contribution of $24,486.

“Our aim in 2019 is to encourage more donations than ever before,” Cory Jackson, president of Jacksons Food Stores, said in a press release. “These funds help raise community awareness about the problem of domestic violence and provide essential resources for survivors and their children. We want to make this the most impactful year of our Peace Doves campaign yet.”

Seeing the dove-covered walls with messages of hope, love and support always leaves an impact on Kelly Starr, WSCADV managing director of public affairs.

“It’s amazing to see a wall filled with doves,” she said. “People write messages of hope and inspiration…it sends a clear visual message.”

Customers can make a tax-deductible donation for a peace dove to support the campaign at any Washington Jacksons Food Store or ExtraMile convenience store from now until Dec. 25.

For more information about WSCADV or the Gift of Peace campaign, go online to https://wscadv.org/.

Photo by Aaron Kunkler
                                All dove sales go to support Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV), a statewide nonprofit member organization focused on prevention, intervention and other supports for domestic violence survivors and their families.

Photo by Aaron Kunkler All dove sales go to support Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV), a statewide nonprofit member organization focused on prevention, intervention and other supports for domestic violence survivors and their families.

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