County, Trust for Public Land complete Squak Mountain property deal

King County and The Trust for Public Land are taking the last few steps in a two-year-long journey to permanently preserve more than 200 acres of Cascade foothills forestland.

  • Monday, January 19, 2015 3:19pm
  • News
The Squak Mountain property should be open to hiking in the springtime.

The Squak Mountain property should be open to hiking in the springtime.

 

King County and The Trust for Public Land are taking the last few steps in a two-year-long journey to permanently preserve more than 200 acres of Cascade foothills forestland.

Coveted for its ecological value, including sheltering the headwaters of a salmon-bearing stream, 226 acres of land on Squak Mountain was purchased by the trust in 2014 for $5 million.

“Permanently preserving forestland in our Cascade foothills will pay dividends for each generation to come,” said King County Executive Dow Constantine. “By saving wildlife habitat and preserving recreational areas, we protect our region’s environmental health and quality of life.”

King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn, whose district includes the land, noted “protecting this stretch of land guarantees recreational opportunities and natural habitats will be preserved for years to come.”

“Successes like Squak Mountain are at the heart of our mission to give everyone a great park close to home,” said Paul Kundtz, Washington State Director of The Trust for Public Land. “It’s been intensely rewarding to be able to work with the great team at King County and achieve this wonderful outcome for the people of Issaquah.”

King County previously purchased about half of the total acreage from the trust. In December, the county made its second and final payment to the trust, concluding the transaction and bringing the acreage into public ownership.

The property was purchased with King County Parks Levy regional open space funds, Conservation Futures funds, and real estate excise taxes.

The forestland remains closed to the public while King County Parks crews prepare the site for public use, including property clean-up, removing infrastructure and establishing trail routes.

The property should be open to hiking in the springtime, and King County Parks will begin a public planning process to help determine future uses for the property, which is being added to the County’s Cougar-Squak Corridor.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@issaquahreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.issaquahreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Screenshot taken from Rosa Parks Elementary School website.
Eastside school wins National Blue Ribbon honors

Rosa Parks Elementary School in Redmond is the only Washington school to win.

Screenshot taken of a King County video showing Wilburton Trestle
King County’s Eastside to receive major multi-modal transportation investment

Private and public investors will help build a regional biking and walking trail to mitigate traffic

Co-owners Sarah Cassidy and Luke Woodward stand in front of The Grange (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Co-owners Sarah Cassidy and Luke Woodward stand in front of The Grange (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
How a King County restaurant and farm work together to make a true farm-to-table experience

The Grange prepares sustainably produced meals pulled from the soil of the Snoqualmie Valley.

NW Carpenters Union members strike in front of downtown Bellevue construction site (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Carpenters union strike interupts some prominent Eastside construction projects

Union representative says members are prepared to strike “as long as it takes.”

Map of proposed landfill expansion sites (screenshot from King County website)
Waste management expert knocks county’s plan to expand landfill

The waste management advocate said the decision to expand seems pre-determined despite assessment.

Participants in fundraiser previous event (courtesy of Alzheimer’s Association Washington State Chapter)
Walk To End Alzheimer’s returns to Eastside on Sept. 25

Alzheimer’s Association moves forward with plans for an in-person event.

Pixabay photo
Union carpenters to go on strike, expected to impact Eastside Microsoft projects

Members authorized strike after rejecting AGC offer for the fourth time.

file photo
The state’s hospitals face “unprecedented collapse” amid COVID uptick warn healthcare unions

Union spokeperson says understaffing was a problem even before the pandemic.

Most Read