District Court Judge Peter Nault dies after 25 years on the bench

The county council will appoint a judge to fill the open spot.

  • Friday, August 16, 2019 1:30am
  • News

Redmond resident Judge Peter Nault died on July 19, after a lengthy career spent in various legal roles and judicial assignments — the most recent of which was hearing civil cases at King County District Court’s Issaquah courthouse location.

Nault, 69, was most recently elected to the court’s Northeast Electoral Division in November 2018, when he ran unopposed for Judge Position 4. He won the election to the District Court bench many times before. He was first elected as a judge in King County District Court in 1994.

“We were very saddened to learn of Judge Nault’s passing. He was well-liked by staff and judges throughout King County District Court,” said Donna Tucker, chief presiding judge, King County District Court, in a statement. “Judge Nault was a friend and mentor to many of us, and we will miss his generosity, humor and willingness to listen. All of us send our deepest condolences to Judge Nault’s family.”

Nault was born in Tacoma and at age 3 his family moved to Ketchikan, Alaska, according to an obituary on Nault’s passing. He married his high school sweetheart Carmen Nault in 1970 and raised two daughters and had five grandchildren.

He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington and received his juris doctorate from Gonzaga University School of Law in Spokane. Nault first began as a deputy prosecuting attorney and continued his work in private practice in Redmond and Bellevue.

He served as an administrative law judge for the cities of Bothell, Duvall, Issaquah, Kirkland, Mercer Island and Redmond. The Washington Trial Lawyers honored Judge Nault as “Judge of the Year” in 2000, according to an announcement from King County District Court.

The King County Council will appoint a judge to take the place of Nault and serve out the remainder of his four-year term.

In July, the county council appointed two replacements for district court judges who moved to the King County Superior Court, said Troy Brown, spokesman for King County District Court. The process took about two to three months, and in both cases, the council appointed judges who had experience serving pro tem.

“I am also deeply grateful to our Issaquah courthouse team, where Judge Nault was on the bench, who have stepped up to continue serving the public smoothly during this time of mourning,” Tucker said.


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