West Point Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.

West Point Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.

EPA loans King County $96.8 million to prevent untreated water from spilling into Puget Sound

Loan comes a week after an over 10 million gallon overflow into the Puget Sound and Lake Washington.

The Environmental Protection Agency has given King County a $96.8 million loan to improve water treatment infrastructure and reduce harmful spillovers into the Puget Sound its tributaries.

The announcement of this loan comes only about a week after power outages and heavy rainfalls caused a handful of water treatment and pumping stations in the county to collectively spill over 10 million gallons of untreated water into the Puget Sound and Lake Washington.

According to a King County press release, it is estimated that 80 percent of the spilled wastewater was storm run-off while 20 percent was sewage. A handful of beaches around the county were closed to prevent people from being exposed to dangerous water conditions.

Most of the beaches have been reopened after consecutive water quality tests revealed they were safe.

According to an EPA press release, the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) loan will help finance the design and construction of a massive underground storage tank that will capture and store untreated stormwater and sewage from heavy storms until it can be treated.

“This WIFIA loan will help King County better manage stormwater during heavy rain events — meaning fewer sewer overflows and less pollution entering the Puget Sound,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler via press release.

King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks Director Christie True said projects funded by this loan will create over 600 construction jobs in the region.




In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@issaquahreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.issaquahreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

previous Zombie Walk (photo taken from www.issaquahzombiewalk.com)
Popular Zombie Walk celebrates 12 years in Downtown Issaquah

Zombies will be welcomed back to downtown October 23, 2-6pm

Geographic dispersion of Washington State Patrol commissioned personnel who lost their jobs Oct. 18. (Washington State Patrol)
Rather than get vaccine, nearly 1,900 state workers lose jobs

Exactly how many people will be out of work for ignoring Gov.… Continue reading

King County Courthouse adjacent to City Hall Park (courtesy of City of Seattle)
County council votes to take dangerous park out of Seattle’s hands

City Hall Park, next to the courthouse in downtown Seattle, has had multiple reports of crime.

stock image
Health care workers call on state’s hospitals to help mitigate staffing crisis

Health care workers unions claim hospitals have the resources to fix the issue.

file photo
Eastside Fire & Rescue says their response times will not be affected by absence of unvaccinated employees

Spokesperson says about 13 employees have left the department at the moment.

File photo
Do you need to pay for your COVID hospital stay?

Washington state law requires hospitals to provide free care for certain income brackets.

Stock photo
State AG Ferguson leads effort supporting local journalism

Federal legislation offers tax credits to subscribers, businesses and news organizations

Photos of drug bust and Fury the K9 unit (courtesy of King County Sheriff's Office)
King County Sheriff’s Office confiscates over $1 million worth of deadly fentanyl during drug bust

With help from a search dog, officers found 97,000 fentanyl pills and eight pounds of heroin.

Most Read