Inaugural perch derby comes to Lake Sammamish State Park

Trout Unlimited will host fishing competition Sept. 15

  • Saturday, August 4, 2018 12:30pm
  • News

Lake Sammamish State Park is holding the first ever perch derby. On September 15, Trout Unlimited will be hosting this fishing competition for fishermen and women of all ages at the Lake Sammamish State Park boat launch from 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

Anglers may fish anywhere on the lake they can access legally. The derby will include two divisions, adult and youth ages 15 and under. Pre-registration fees are $20 per adult, $5 per youth. On-site registration will be $30 per adult and $15 per youth. All proceeds from this event will be used for Lake Sammamish kokanee restoration and outreach.

There are numerous places at the park where anglers can fish from shore as well. Many choose to fish from the beaches or boat docks. In addition to perch, sport fish in Lake Sammamish include bass, black crappie, sunfish, catfish, and the occasional cutthroat. Please note that native kokanee salmon are not open for fishing and should be released ASAP.

This tournament will specifically target yellow perch. Yellow perch were planted by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in Lake Sammamish many decades ago. They are abundant and are predators of the endangered kokanee salmon at certain life stages. The derby will not only help to reduce the number of perch in the lake but will educate anglers about kokanee salmon and the ongoing work to improve the watersheds and health of Lake Sammamish. More information on Lake Sammamish kokanee restoration efforts can be found at http://lakesammamishkokanee.com/.

Anglers will be allowed to weigh in a max of 25 yellow perch. All fish will be weighed and measured and returned to the angler. Prizes will be given in each division for longest fish, heaviest fish, and highest combined weight of catch. Bass Pro Shops, the Coho Café and Work Wear Place have generously donated prizes for the derby.

To register for the derby, visit https://tinyurl.com/perchderby. For more information, contact David Kyle at Trout Unlimited at dkyle@tu.org or (425) 287-2370.

Trout Unlimited (TU) is a national nonprofit whose mission is to conserve, protect and restore North America’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds.

A Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the park. Passes can be purchased at the park or online

at www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

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