EPO Replacement Levy total combined tax rates from 1998-2033. Photo courtesy of ISD

EPO Replacement Levy total combined tax rates from 1998-2033. Photo courtesy of ISD

ISD approves new replacement levy resolution

The EPO levy will be on the February 11, 2020 ballot.

The Issaquah School Board passed a resolution for a replacement Educational Programs and Operations (EP&O) levy at the Sept. 12 school board meeting.

The levy will be placed on the Feb. 11, 2020, ballot.

The levy would maintain current funding for programs such as career and technical education, mental health counselors, dual language and safety. It would replace the levy approved by voters in 2018 that expires at the end of 2020.

The district is asking voters to approve $49.85 million in 2021, and $54 million in 2022.

If passed, a tax of about $1.33 per $1,000 of assessed valuation ($931 annually for a home valued at $700,000) will provide $49.85 million for the levy made in 2020 for collection in 2021. A tax of about $1.36 per $1,000 of assessed valuation ($952 annually for a home valued at $700,000) will provide $54 million for the levy made in 2021 for collection in 2022.

Prior to the Sept. 12 meeting, a levy development committee was formed last June. The purpose of the committee was to recommend a single levy package for a 2020 ballot measure. The committee presented its recommendation to Superintendent Ron Thiele, who brought the final recommendation to the Issaquah School Board for approval on Sept. 12.

The committee included 24 school representatives, nine principals from each region and grade span, one Issaquah schools volunteer, one PTSA councilmember, one Issaquah Education Association representative, one classified staff representative, one business representative, one senior community representative and two community members at-large.

The levy development committee considered the proposed content, total cost and tax impact of a single two-year ballot measure.The committee members formed levy packages that included funding essential to ensuring ISD has all the resources possible to meet its mission, and safely and efficiently maintain facilities and property according to state and district use standards and schedules.

For the 2021 EP&O levy, there is an estimated per student levy authority of $2,400 with an enrollment projection of 20,770 students for a total of $49.85 million.

“This amount is less than the projected statutory levy authority of $2,575 per student by $175 per student FTE,” according to the Advance Notice of the EP&O levy.

For the 2022 EP&O levy, ISD recommended an inflationary increase of just over 3 percent above the base statutory authority of $2,500 to $2,575 per student.

“Using a projected 2020-21 student enrollment projection of 20,950 for a total amount of (about $53.94 million) rounded up to $54 million. This amount is $80 less per student than estimated statutory authority for calendar year 2022,” according to the Advance Notice of the EP&O levy.

According to ISD, the district is asking voters for about $6.7 million less than they are legally authorized to collect.

“The total two-year recommended levy amount is $103.85 million.This proposal represents a below full authority levy that is scaled down $6.65 million from the Levy Development Committee recommendation,” according to the Advance Notice of the EP&O levy. “The total combined tax rate is estimated to decrease by $0.21/1,000 from $3.46 to $3.25 in calendar year 2021. The 2022 estimated total combined rate is estimated to be at $3.30/1,000, which is $0.16/1,000 less than the current total tax rate. The resulting total combined local school tax rate in both the aforementioned years is the lowest rate for ISD citizens in over 20 years.”

At the Sept. 12 meeting, Thiele said he is confident that the amount of funding would allow the district to maintain its current programs while remaining fiscally responsible and sensitive to the overall tax rate.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@issaquahreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.issaquahreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Stock image
Campgrounds to reopen in 22 Washington counties

Campgrounds in counties actively in Phase 2 of the reopening plan will begin to welcome visitors June 1, state says.

King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht. FILE PHOTO
King County sheriff releases message about Minneapolis Police officer

Mitzi Johanknecht calls video of officer kneeling on neck of George Floyd ‘heartbreaking and disturbing’

File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
                                File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
Rural King County mayors want state to let them enter Phase 2

Mayors cite heavy economic damage from prolonged shutdown.

New dashboard shows how far along King County is to meeting Phase II metrics

The county has met more than half its goals, but the ones it hasn’t met are critical in determining how many people are still being infected, and how quickly people are being tested.

As sales tax plummets in King County, mental health and drug program funding dries up

County will need to make severe cuts to MIDD program this year.

Auburn Mountain View Cemetery Manager Craig Hudson, center, confers with maintenance workers David Partridge, left, and Zach Hopper in March 2020. Sound Publishing file photo
State allows weddings, funerals, religious services to restart with restrictions

Gov. Inslee issues new rules during May 27 news conference.

State loosens cougar hunting restrictions

The regulations will impact 19 areas around the state.

American Medical Response (AMR) organized a parade of first responders to show appreciation for St. Elizabeth Hospital staff April 30. Photo by Ray Miller-Still/Sound Publishing
The complications of counting COVID deaths in Washington

State relies on results of tests and death certificates in calculating the daily toll of the disease.

Most Read