Issaquah city council plans for future improvements to water utilities

For the first time since 2012, the city of Issaquah has updated the Water System Plan.

For the first time since 2012, the city of Issaquah has updated the Water System Plan, detailing the required roles and obligations to provide utility service to citizens.

A Water System Plan serves to detail water utility capacity, policies and operation, document existing water sources, demonstrate how the plan will address current and upcoming needs consistent with the law, and present a Capital Improvement Plan with priorities for construction to address the maintenance and growth planned for the system.

The updated plan was developed to incorporate future capital projects such as the ongoing discussion about a water treatment plant in the city. According to the staff report presented to council, the water supply and usage data were used in the development in the water demand forecast. That demand forecast is then used to evaluate future options and priorities regarding future capital projects.

The staff report lists the need for additional treatment of groundwater supplies as a primary finding of the 2018 plan. The groundwater supply will be combined with regional supplies to serve future demand, the report states.

Councilmember Victoria Hunt highlighted some of the public comments received supporting the potential use of fluoride in a water treatment plant. Hunt noted emails from dentists and a pediatrician.

While a discussion on a water treatment plant is planned to follow the approval of the plan, both Hunt and Councilmember Tola Marts said they are looking forward to future discussions.

The city’s Water System Plan will remain valid for 10 years.

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