Issaquah Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) at last year’s Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank concert. Chris Schaening / courtesy photo

Issaquah Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) at last year’s Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank concert. Chris Schaening / courtesy photo

Issaquah Philharmonic Orchestra to perform fourth annual food raiser concert

The IPO will perform a free public concert in support of the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank May 20 st Skyline High School.

The Issaquah Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) will perform a free public concert in support of the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank on May 20 at Skyline High School. It is the orchestra’s fourth annual food raiser concert.

The concert will feature “Fingal’s Cave Overture” by Mendelssohn, “Concerto in E flat major for alto saxophone” by Glazunov featuring Duane Bowen as soloist, “Hoe-Down from Rodeo” by Copland, “Carmen Suite No. 1” by Bizet, and the “Moldau” by Smetana.

The IPO has roots that go back to 2000 when two friends, Joyce Cunningham and Duane Bowen, decided to start a reading orchestra for fun and friendship. The original group evolved into a non profit community orchestra that continues to play for fun and friendship.

“We have musicians that range from middle-school age to 92,” conductor Duane Bowen said. “I think we represent the community well, and we always have a lot of fun.”

In 2016, the orchestra held the final concert of the season as a “food raiser concert” in support of the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank. For the final concert of the season, the orchestra partners with the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank and the Sammamish Family YMCA and invites the community to bring non-perishable food items to help the food bank fight summer hunger.

“The orchestra is really excited about this season’s food raiser concert. We are grateful to the Sammamish Family YMCA for partnering with us again and to (County Councilmember Kathy Lambert) for serving as our master of ceremonies,” IPO president Sue Byron said. “It is going to be a very special event having our conductor as the soloist on the saxophone concerto.”

The event has grown each year and to date has brought in 3,667 pounds of food to help fight summer hunger in the community. And the effort is appreciated.

“We rely on the generosity of the community to meet the needs of neighbors who are struggling with food insecurity, so we’re extremely grateful to the Issaquah Philharmonic for lending their time and talent to partner with us in this effort,” said Bonnie DeCaro-Monahan, development director for Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank.

The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. A food donation drop-off site will be available at the Sammamish Family YMCA for those interested in donating but are unable to attend the concert.

“Please bring food and enjoy the music,” Bowen said.

For more information about the upcoming concert, go online to http://iphil.org/.

Chris Schaening / courtesy photos
                                King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert was the master of ceremonies for last year’s concert and will be again for the 2019 concert.

Chris Schaening / courtesy photos King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert was the master of ceremonies for last year’s concert and will be again for the 2019 concert.

IPO conductor Duane Bowen at last year’s Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank concert.

IPO conductor Duane Bowen at last year’s Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank concert.

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