King County Council with Sarah Reyneveld, chair of the King County Women’s Advisory Board. Photo courtesy of King County

King County Council with Sarah Reyneveld, chair of the King County Women’s Advisory Board. Photo courtesy of King County

King County proclaims March as Women’s History Month

This year’s theme is Womxn Who Lead: Stories from the past and how they influence the future.

The King County Council proclaimed the month of March as Women’s History Month. Councilmembers Jeanne Kohl-Welles, Claudia Balducci and Kathy Lambert co-sponsored the fourth annual proclamation on March 13.

The councilwomen are three of the 15 women who have served on the council, beginning with Bernice Stern in 1969. For the past 50 years, women from all over the county have represented the people of King County on the council.

The first woman to be elected to a city council was Carrie Shumway. In 1911, Shumway was elected to the Kirkland City Council, a year after Washington women were permanently given the right to vote.

“It’s important to remember we have come a long way so that we know we will be able to go further,” Lambert said. “I want to continue to increase the awareness of modern day challenges, but to remember we have made great progress.”

King County’s 2019 proclamation recognizes and celebrates “the contribution women have made to our nation’s history and will make to its future.”

The council had the opportunity to celebrate, noting that “women of every race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability and socioeconomic background continue to make historic contributions to the growth and strength of King County, Washington Sate, our nation and the global community.”

Receiving the proclamation was chair of the King County Women’s Advisory Board (WAB) Sarah Reyneveld.

“The WAB appreciates the opportunity to partner with the King County Council to help strengthen women’s access to justice, improve wage equity and support family-friendly work places,” she said. “We look forward to continuing to work with the council to further improve child care access and affordability throughout King County.”

To celebrate Women’s History Month, a Womxn’s History Month Panel will take place on March 25 at the King County Courthouse, 516 Third Avenue, on the ninth Floor (Room E-942) in Seattle. The fourth annual panel discussion will be co-sponsored by councilwomen Lambert, Balducci and Kohl-Welles. The free event is open to the public. Doors open at 11 a.m., with the panel starting at 11:45 a.m.




In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@issaquahreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.issaquahreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Overlake staff share why they mask up

The video features medical professionals explaining their personal reasons for why it is important to wear masks to reduce the spread of COVID-19

New report shows increase in East King County homelessness

East King County includes Mercer Island, Bellevue, Kirkland and Issaquah.

The Red Lion Inn at 1 South Grady Way in Renton is being used as temporary site to relocate individuals experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Olivia Sullivan/staff photo.
Renton battles King County over temporary shelter at Red Lion Hotel

County officials believe emergency health order will supersede city’s move.

A train route that would shuttle people between Eastern and Western Washington could tie in with the proposed ultra-high-speed rail between B.C. and Portland. Photo courtesy RobertStafford/Pixabay.com
State receives King County to Spokane rail study

It would take about eight and a half hours to reach the Inland Empire from Puget Sound.

Bret Chiafalo. File photo
Supreme Court says state can punish WA faithless electors

Justices: Presidential electors, including Everett man, must keep pledge to back popular vote winner

Gov. Jay Inslee issued new guidance allowing the resumption of self-service buffets, salad bars, salsa bars, drink stations and other types of communal food sources in Phase 2. File photo
Buffets and salad bars back on the menu in King County

Gov. Jay Inslee has revised rules to allow self-serve food areas in Phase 2 of the state’s reopening.

Folks enjoy outdoor eating during the start of the Streatery Pilot in downtown Issaquah. Photo courtesy city of Issaquah.
Streatery Pilot on pause while COVID-19 cases rise

The city council will review the pilot program July 20 for possible reopening July 24

Brian Tilley (left) and Katie Dearman work the wash station Friday at Kate’s Greek American Deli in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Governor’s no-mask, no-service order begins across Washington

“Just do not ring up the sale,” Gov. Jay Inslee said about customers who do not don the proper masks.

King County homeless count: 11,751 people, up 5 percent from 2019

One night a year, volunteers spread out across Seattle and King County… Continue reading

Most Read