WSDOT work crews prepare for around-the-clock I-90 closures

The single-lane closures will run throughout the first two weeks of October with a two-day break.

WSDOT contractor crews will grind and repave the WB I-90 Raging River Bridge deck. Photo courtesy of the <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/" target="_blank">WSDOT Flickr account </a>

WSDOT contractor crews will grind and repave the WB I-90 Raging River Bridge deck. Photo courtesy of the WSDOT Flickr account

Workers are preparing to close single-lanes of westbound Interstate 90 between Issaquah and North Bend to repair the highway across the Raging River Bridge.

The Washington State Department of Transportation advises locals who use westbound I-90 to get between North Bend and Preston should plan for additional delays throughout the first two weeks of October.

WSDOT hired contractor crews who will close a single lane of westbound I-90 across the Raging River Bridge, located just east of the Preston/Fall City off-ramp, or exit 22. These around-the-clock closures will give them room to repair the roadway approaching the bridge, creating a smoother ride for drivers WSDOT said in a press release.

The closure will be split into two parts. The first closure will begin at 8 p.m. on Sept. 30 through 5 a.m. Oct. 5. Work crews will close the left lane of westbound I-90 and shift the two open lanes to the right. Additionally, the speed limit will be reduced to 55 mph.

WSDOT work crews will close I-90 for the second-half of repair work two days after the first six days of repair work.

The closure will begin at 8 p.m. on Oct. 7 and run through 5 a.m. Oct. 12. Crews will close the right lane of westbound I-90 and the two open lanes will be shifted to the left. The speed limit will also be reduced to 55 mph.

All of this weather-dependent work is part of a $21.7 million project to rehabilitate I-90 between Issaquah and North Bend.

Drivers can get real-time information on their phone with the WSDOT traffic app, following the WSDOT traffic Twitter feed and by checking the I-90 construction webpage.


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WSDOT contractor crews chipped away the high spots on the EB I-90 Winery Road Bridge after hydro-milling. Photo courtesy of the <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/" target="_blank">WSDOT Flickr account </a>

WSDOT contractor crews chipped away the high spots on the EB I-90 Winery Road Bridge after hydro-milling. Photo courtesy of the WSDOT Flickr account

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