Buddy 2.0 has been the live mascot of Beaver Lake Middle School for 12 years; her predecessor Buddy 1.0 held the title for 13 years. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

Buddy 2.0 has been the live mascot of Beaver Lake Middle School for 12 years; her predecessor Buddy 1.0 held the title for 13 years. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

Beloved mascot of Sammamish school to live on in bronze statue after retirement

Beaver Lake Middle School has had a live bulldog on campus for over two dozen years.

A member of Beaver Lake Middle School will be gone from campus but never forgotten as she is set to be immortalized in bronze.

As the official mascot of the school, Buddy 2.0 the bulldog has been a fixture at the school throughout the 12 years of her lifetime (and before her time, her predecessor Buddy 1.0 reigned supreme for 13 years).

This June, however, Buddy and her owner Patrick Ford, who teache P.E. and industrial education, will both retire from their duties.

Over two dozen years ago, Beaver Lake students voted to name the Bulldogs as the school’s mascot (other options included the Dragons and the Cobras). Ford, thinking his wife wouldn’t agree, joked that he should get a live mascot for the school. To his surprise, she said, “That’s a great idea.”

“I put my foot in it and we got a bulldog,” he laughed.

Since then, Buddy has accompanied her owner to school every day, where she has been the hit of the gym and shop classroom. Although parents need to sign a permission form for Buddy to be allowed throughout the campus (rather than just in Ford’s classrooms), Ford said that over the past dozen years, 100 percent of parents have signed.

“They just buy in, and Buddy is cool,” he said.

Every day before school, Buddy spends time getting petted by her fans in the commons, and she has been known to come out and show her school spirit at events like bingo and trivia nights.

“It’s been therapeutic for me just to be 3 feet from her with all this love pouring on her for decades,” Ford said.

To remember Buddy, Ford commissioned a bronze statue of the beloved pooch to be made by artists Katrina Toft and Ed Kroupa of Two Ravens Studio in Tacoma, the studio that created the bronze “Ivan the Gorilla” statue for Point Defiance Zoo.

However, immortalizing Buddy in bronze does not come cheap. Ford is using fundly.com to raise the $8,000 needed for the statue by mid-June, when it is set to be placed at the school. So far, only $2,500 has been raised.

Several contributors to the cause have expressed their love for Buddy and appreciation of Ford’s efforts in bringing her to the school.

“Beaver Lake is near and dear to my heart … I remember Buddy 1.0 and how he and Patrick Ford brought spirit to our school!” Lynn Pitts commented on the fundraiser web page. “Long live Buddy!”

Mandy Brown commented that Buddy has made “an amazing impact” on the Beaver Lake community.

“We love you Buddy!” Penni Ling wrote on the web page. “You have touched so many children’s lives and given so much love and happy memories to us all. You will forever be our Bu.”

Ford said that he hopes that news of the fundraiser will reach the original students who voted for the mascot in the early 1990s, and who have since moved away from the area.

“I would’ve never been a bulldog person if it wasn’t for Beaver Lake Middle School.”

To contribute, visit fundly.com and search “Legacy bronze statue of Buddy 2.0 the school mascot.”

The students of BLMS love spending time with Buddy on campus. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

The students of BLMS love spending time with Buddy on campus. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

Buddy has been known to dress up in costume for holidays like Halloween. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

Buddy has been known to dress up in costume for holidays like Halloween. Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

More in News

President’s emergency declaration sparks immediate legal backlash

Attorney General Bob Ferguson said his team will sue the White House if federal funds originally intended for Washington state are interrupted.

Bill targets sexual health curriculum in Washington schools

Senate Bill 5395 is co-sponsored by 17 Democratic representatives and introduced by Sen. Claire Wilson, D-Federal Way.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline.
Study shows King County’s treatment funding is making progress

A document on the county’s .1 percent health sales tax was accepted Wednesday by the county council.

Founder of Everyone for Veterans, Theresa Cheng helps Alice Richard deliver a mattress to a veteran family in Federal Way as part of the Wingman Project in Dec. 2018. Photo Courtesy of Everyone for Veterans.
Actions speak louder than words; Everyone for Veterans is making an effort to help low-income veterans and their families

Non-profit organization connects community members with veterans through their wingman project

The Overlake Medical Center in Bellevue remained open through the wintry weather. Photo courtesy of Overlake Medical Center.
Overlake Medical essential staff housed in hotels

Over 250 rooms helped ensure needed employees made it to their shift.

State bill would address strain of long-term healthcare costs

Median retirement savings falls short of what wellness costs.

Council approves funding for Front Street improvement project

Council has approved funding for the Front Street Streetscape between Sunset Way and NE Alder.

Walsh appointed to Issaquah City Council position no. 4

On Feb. 5, Lindsey Walsh was appointed to the vacant city council position left by Bill Ramos.

Children’s play area at Seadrunar. Photo by Lauren Davis via Facebook
Seedy side of Seadrunar: Drug rehab center accused of neglect, exploitation

Public records reveal that Seattle facility was accused of neglecting children and clients in its care.

Most Read