Issaquah highlights resources for storm debris removal

Locals can get rid of storm debris for no extra charge on regular yard-waste removal days.

The city of Issaquah recently announced the city’s waste removal provider is planning to collect storm debris as part of the regularly-scheduled food and yard waste collection day.

The announcement came in wake of the recent windstorms that caused power outages on the Eastside. The service is not provided in reaction to the windstorms, but a resource available to Recology CleanScapes customers.

Residents who are served by Recology CleanScapes can use the service as long as the debris is cut into pieces no longer than 4 feet and no wider than 4 inches. There is no extra charge unless the debris exceeds the typical 192-gallon limit per each pickup day. If the extra yard waste cannot fit in a container can, locals can bundle the waste or place it in craft yard waste bags.

Locals who do not receive food and yard waste pickup services can schedule a collection for an additional charge by calling 425-837-1234.

A weekend windstorm hit the central Puget Sound area overnight Saturday, Jan. 5, and into Sunday morning (Jan. 6).

Schools in the Issaquah School District had a two-hour delayed start on Monday, Jan. 7, because of road debris and closures, the district website said. Sunny Hills in Sammamish remained closed all day due to a power outage.

During the weekend storm some gusts reached an estimated 60 mph at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport at 3 a.m. on Sunday, according to accuweather.com. Most areas were hit with winds of 45-55 mph.

The weather system — which originated from inland southern Oregon — was first forecasted to move south toward California, said Jeff Michalski, meteorologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. By Friday, the storm began to take a different path north. And on Saturday morning officials had enough confidence to issue a wind advisory for Eastside cities.

When new weather models predicted higher speed gusts, that warning was upgraded to a high-wind warning early Saturday evening, just ahead of the storm, Michalski said.

The storm, unlike others to pass through, was a quick burst of winds for one to two hours.

“And then it was gone,” Michalski said. “Opposed to some long-duration storms we’ve seen in the past, there was still significant damage with power outages across the region.”


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